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mental health - Latrobe Regional Hospital

Acute and Bed Based Care

Latrobe Regional Hospital is the main provider of mental health services in Gippsland.

The acute bed-based service offers inpatient, sub-acute and residential programs across the region.

People who require a hospital stay and more intensive treatment are admitted to the Flynn Unit while people over the age of 65 are cared for by the Macalister Unit, also based at the hospital.

There are 14 Community Residential Care Units (CRCU) in Traralgon which offer accommodation and supported care over a longer term and six secure extended care unit beds at LRH.

Bairnsdale is home to the Prevention and Recovery Care Service (PARCS) which enables people to receive treatment in a residential setting.

Our Agnes Parent and Infant Unit provides a residential therapeutic program enabling specialist emotional and psychological support and care to families experiencing postnatal difficulties after the arrival of a baby.

The Acute Community Intervention Service provides mental health triage, mental health support to general hospital wards, mental health services in the Emergency Department and acute mental health follow-up in the community.

If you or someone you know needs help or advice, you should call the 24-hour triage telephone service. A senior clinical staff member will assess how specialist services can best help you.

Contact details:

Mental Health Triage Service. Phone: 1300 363 322

 

Acute Community Intervention Service

The Acute Community Intervention Service provides 24-hour specialist mental health services.

Taking the first step in seeking help for mental illness can be daunting.

If you need to refer to specialist mental health care, require a consultation or just need mental health information or advice telephone Mental Health Triage on 1300 363 322.

This is the single point of entry for referral into mental health programs.

This is not an emergency service. If you or someone you know requires emergency assistance, dial 000.

Mental health triage is not a counselling service or an emergency service. If you require emergency assistance, dial 000 or if you need to speak with a counsellor urgently call Lifeline on 13 11 14.

Members of the mental health triage team are trained to assess whether there is a mental health issue that needs addressing. They determine what the issue is and what can be done to assist. Callers will then be referred to the most appropriate service.

Depending on the circumstances of the call, the triage team will categorise the situation with a number between 1 and 5:

  • Response 1 calls require immediate emergency assistance because there is a serious safety threat to the person or others. In this case, mental health triage will hang up the phone and organise emergency services to attend the situation. If you are involved in a situation where someone is violent towards themselves or others, phone emergency services on 000 immediately and explain the person has a mental illness. Once the initial safety threat is alleviated, referral for further assessment by mental health professionals will be organised.
  • Response 2 indicates the person is of moderate risk to themselves or others and response is required within an hour.
  • Response 3 indicates the person involved is of moderate risk to themselves or others and they require attention that day. While the risk to themselves and others is currently contained, the triage team believes the person’s state could escalate.
  • Response 4 indicates the person involved is in need of non-urgent psychiatric intervention, which delivers a response within 24 hours. Because the person is considered to be at low risk, the timing of an assessment is organised with the person at a convenient time.
  • Response 5 is a deferred response, where no psychiatric symptoms are evident but the person may need assistance in some other way. Triage will refer these people to other service providers to receive the help they need.

When the triage team decides specialist mental health services are needed to assist someone, a more comprehensive assessment of the person’s mental state is provided through an intake assessment.

Mental health services are also provided in the Emergency Department and consultation liaison mental health services are available across LRH.

Specialist alcohol and other drug services are also provided in the Emergency Department.

Acute community mental health follow-up may be accessed through the mental health team located at Washington Street, Traralgon. 

Contact details:

Mental Health Triage Service 1300 363 322

Emergency assistance 000

Lifeline 13 11 14

 

Adult Mental Health Service

People aged between 18-65 years have access to a range of programs to assist with their mental health recovery.

Your journey will start by contacting our Mental Health Triage Service on 1300 363 322.

Our senior clinical staff will assess how specialist services can help you or someone you know.

  • Flynn Unit:The Flynn Unit at Latrobe Regional Hospital provides intensive treatment. Flynn delivers a range of therapeutic interventions ranging from medically-based pharmaceutical interventions to social, psychological and recreational therapies with the aim of managing the illness and preventing relapse. The needs of the person are met by a team including nursing, medical and allied health professionals.
  • Secure Extended Care Unit:People with a severe and prolonged mental illness may require specialised care in the Secure Extended Care Unit (SECU) at Latrobe Regional Hospital. It aims to provide a safe and caring environment for patients who have behavioural disturbances that pose a risk to themselves and others and who can’t be managed effectively by alternative services.
  • Community Residential Care Unit:The Community Residential Care Unit (CRCU) aims to assist you to develop your skills towards maximum independence by providing a pathway for you to live in the wider community. The CRCU features 14 independent residential units that have 24-hour support from qualified staff. It is located in Traralgon within easy walking distance of the local shopping centre, railway station and bus routes.
  • Prevention and Recovery Care:For some people, mental health treatment and recovery may be better suited in a supported residential setting. The Prevention and Recovery Care Service (PARCS) is a 10-bed residential facility in Bairnsdale run as a partnership between SNAP Gippsland and Latrobe Regional Hospital Mental Health Services.
  • Continuing Care:People are referred to the Continuing Care service after assessments by triage and an intake team. Continuing Care aims to help people manage their recovery in a community setting in partnership with other health providers, non-government mental health services and community and business organisations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aged Persons Mental Health Service

Older Gippslanders with a mental illness or displaying challenging behaviours are cared for in the community by the Aged Persons Mental Health Service (APMHS).

It is recognised that older people have special needs that require a different treatment approach to younger adults.

 

Who can we help?

Residents of Gippsland who are over 65 years:

  • who have had a mental illness for many years and are now experiencing issues relating to growing older
  • who develop a functional mental illness such as depression for the first time in later life
  • who develop an organic disorder such as Alzheimer’s disease and have associated challenging behaviours. We provide services to any adult in this category regardless of age.

 

How can we help you?

APMHS provides a home based assessment, treatment, planning and case management service. The assessment covers the physical, medical, emotional and safety status of the person in the context of their entire life. An individual plan is developed in conjunction with the person and their carer. A case manager will be responsible for coordinating care and act as a point of contact while a person and their carer is involved with the service.

Hospital admission may be required. The Macalister Unit at Latrobe Regional Hospital provides intensive assessment and treatment services.

APMHS also provides specialist advice through education, consultancy and collaboration with other aged care service providers.

 

Where are we located?

APMHS workers are based at the following Community Mental Health Service offices:

Bairnsdale:Macleod Street, phone 5152 8800

Korumburra: 4 Gordon Street, phone 5654 0800

Latrobe Valley:20 Washington Street, Traralgon, phone 5128 0100

Orbost:Boundary Road, phone 5154 6721

Sale:Cnr Palmerston and Cunningham Streets, phone 5142 1900

Warragul:31-35 Gladstone Street, phone 5624 3600

Yarram:20 Nicol Street, phone 5182 0245

 

Hours of operation

APMHS staff are available Monday to Friday 8.30am-5pm.

The adult service duty staff member attends to any emergencies after these hours including weekends. Their availability may vary after 8.30pm.

You can contact this person through the Mental Health Triage Service on 1300 363 322.

 

Referrals

General Practitioners usually make referrals, but a relative, carer or individual can also make a referral.

Referrals are made and advice sought through the Mental Health Triage Service on 1300 363 322.

You will be assisted by a senior clinical staff member 24-hours a day.

If you choose to make a referral, ensure you have the following information:

  • name, date of birth, address and contact number of the person being referred
  • name and contact number of next of kin
  • name and contact number of the person’s doctor or specialist
  • medication the person takes, if known
  • current medical and physical state
  • the problems that have prompted you to make the referral
  • if other services are involved
  • your name and contact number as the referrer.

 

 

Agnes Parent and Infant Unit

Becoming a parent can be challenging and at times, overwhelming.

The Agnes Parent and Infant Unit at Latrobe Regional Hospital is a space for parents and infants to get to know each other and strengthen their bond.

It is a free, non-judgmental, early intervention service provided over 4 nights and 5 days. It is flexible to meet your family's needs.

The Agnes Unit can help with:

  • adjustment or emotional issues
  • difficulties with bonding
  • sleep and settling difficulties
  • feeding difficulties.

 

Contact details:

If you or your health provider feel you may benefit from a stay at Agnes Unit, phone 5173 8553.

 

 

Agnes Parent and Infant Unit

Becoming a parent can be challenging and at times, overwhelming.

The Agnes Parent and Infant Unit at Latrobe Regional Hospital is a space for parents and infants to get to know each other and strengthen their bond.

It is a free, non-judgmental, early intervention service provided over 4 nights and 5 days. It is flexible to meet your family's needs.

The Agnes Unit can help with:

  • adjustment or emotional issues
  • difficulties with bonding
  • sleep and settling difficulties
  • feeding difficulties.

 

Contact details:

If you or your health provider feel you may benefit from a stay at Agnes Unit, phone 5173 8553.

Carer consultant

Carer Consultant

When a person you care for is diagnosed with mental health issues, there can be significant consequences and impacts on your own physical and mental health.

Partners, family and friends can be affected by the stresses of the ripple effect that often occurs when a person becomes unwell.

Caring for a person can mean providing emotional support, offering encouragement towards seeking treatment and helping to negotiate the maze of health services.

But taking care of yourself as a carer is a vital part of being able to maintain the caring role for someone with a mental illness, as the stresses may impact on relationships, work, family and finances.

Having a plan for the carer's own health, maintaining connections with others and being able to share experiences of coping strategies, together with education about the illness can help reduce the overload.

Our Carer Consultant has a lived experience in caring for someone with mental health issues and an understanding of the mental health system. The consultant provides advice, support and advocacy to carers of a person in the public mental health system.

Contact details:

Carer Consultant phone 5128 0100 

 

 

 

CASEA - Child and Youth Mental Health Service and Schools Early Action

Children may at some point demonstrate challenging behaviour in the classroom and at home. Some children and their parents may need help to manage the behaviour.

The CASEA program works in primary schools across Gippsland. It aims to help children from Prep to Grade 3 develop positive social, emotional and behavioural strategies.

 It also works with parents to build their confidence in responding to a child's challenging behaviour and emotional difficulties.

Child and Youth Mental Health Service

Children and young people may need support for serious emotional and behavioural disturbances.

The Child and Youth Mental Health Service (CYMHS) is a free community-based program for young people and their families or carers.

 

Who can we help?

We see children and young people up to the age of 18 years.

Some of the disturbances we assess and provide treatment for include:

  • anxiety
  • attention deficit hyperactivity
  • autism
  • children and young people experiencing suicidal thoughts/behaviour
  • depression
  • eating disorders
  • obsessive behaviours
  • other symptoms related to significant emotional/psychological problems
  • post-traumatic stress reactions
  • relationship difficulties.

 

How can we help you?

After being referred to the service, a young person will be assessed by one or more clinicians. They come from a number of different disciplines including social work, occupational therapy, psychology, psychiatric nursing and child psychiatry.

In some cases hospital admission may be required and this may be at the Flynn Unit at Latrobe Regional Hospital which provides intensive assessment and treatment services. A case manager will remain involved with the young person and their carer throughout their hospital stay.

CYMHS also provides specialist advice through education, consultancy and collaboration with other service providers.

We also have a mobile outreach service to ensure young people receive the care they need, wherever they may be.

 

Where are we located?

CAMHS workers are based at the following Community Mental Health Service offices:

Bairnsdale:Macleod Street, phone 5152 8800

Korumburra:4 Gordon Street, phone 5654 0800

Latrobe Valley:20 Washington Street, Traralgon, phone 5128 0100

Orbost:Boundary Road, phone 5154 6721

Sale:Cnr Palmerston and Cunningham Streets, phone 5142 1900

Warragul:31-35 Gladstone Street, phone 5624 3600

Yarram:20 Nicol Street, phone 5182 0245

 

How to contact our service

Children, adolescents and their families may be referred by any concerned adult.

All require parental or guardian consent. In some circumstances older adolescents may refer themselves.

It is useful for the child or young person to be seen by a General Practitioner before the referral.

The General Practitioner may wish to make the referral and continue involvement following an assessment.

You can make a referral or seek advice 24-hours a day through the Mental Health Triage Service on 1300 363 322

 

Referrals

General Practitioners usually make referrals, but a relative, carer or individual can also make a referral.

Referrals are made and advice sought through the Mental Health Triage Service on 1300 363 322.

You will be assisted by a senior clinical staff member 24-hours a day.

If you choose to make a referral, ensure you have the following information:

  • name, date of birth, address and contact number of the person being referred
  • name and contact number of next of kin
  • name and contact number of the person’s doctor or specialist
  • medication the person takes, if known
  • current medical and physical state
  • the problems that have prompted you to make the referral
  • if other services are involved
  • your name and contact number as the referrer.

 

Community Residential Care Unit (CRCU)

The Community Residential Care Unit (CRCU) aims to assist you to develop your skills towards maximum independence by providing a pathway for you to live in the wider community.

The CRCU features 14 independent residential units that have 24-hour support from qualified staff. It is located in Traralgon within easy walking distance of the local shopping centre, railway station and bus routes.

Each unit is fully furnished and has its own lounge, bedroom, fully equipped kitchen, laundry and bathroom facilities.

There is also an administration building where the staff and reception offices are located.

 The CRCU helps people aged between 16 and 64 years who are currently receiving care from Latrobe Regional Hospital Mental Health Services across Gippsland.

 The care team includes health care professionals from multiple disciplines such as nursing, social work, occupational therapy and psychiatry who will actively work with you, your family or carer and community clinician to develop your plan for recovery.

Contact details:

19 Garden Grove, Traralgon, 3844. Phone: 5128 0080

CRCU Client Brochure

 

 

Community Services

Latrobe Regional Hospital has community mental health teams in Traralgon, Sale, Bairnsdale, Warragul, Korumburra, Wonthaggi, Yarram and Orbost caring for children, youth, adults and aged persons.

 

Court liaison and Koori services

Koori Liaison

Our Koori Mental Health Liaison Officer helps to provide culturally appropriate services and practical support to Aboriginal people who use Latrobe Regional Hospital Mental Health Services.

The Koori officer also works within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to build relationships and discuss mental health issues.

Contact details:

Koori Mental Health Liaison Officer phone 5128 0100.

 

Court Liaison Service

The Mental Health Court Liaison Service is a court based program provided by the Community Forensic Mental Health Service.

The service provides mental state assessment and advice to courts and other referrers on people appearing before the court in criminal cases who are thought to have a mental illness or display concerning behaviour thought to be related to mental illness.

  • Experienced forensic mental health clinicians undertake mental state assessments and provide feedback to the court. This assists the court in making well informed decisions in situations where factors related to serious mental illness need to be taken into account.

Contact details:

Latrobe Valley Magistrates Court phone 5116 5222.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dual Diagnosis Program

Dual diagnosis is when people experience both a co-occurring mental illness and a substance use problem.

Many people with alcohol and drug issues have a range of mental health challenges such as anxiety and depression, at higher rates than the general community.

The Dual Diagnosis Program assists mental health services and alcohol and other drug services to support people who need care. It helps services, like Latrobe Regional Hospital to develop quality practices to assist people on their journey to a positive health outcome.

Dual diagnosis teams across Victoria work together to ensure the treatment a person receives is consistent, wherever they may live.

Consumers who experience comorbid mental health and substance use problems require that care of both problems, be provided as core business from both mental health and drug and alcohol services. 

  

For Mental Health and Alcohol and Drug treatment services Dual Diagnosis (DD) is the RULE not the exception and this leads to a greater level of complexity with consumers at increased risk of a range of poor outcomes including serious physical illness, social isolation and despair, self-harm and suicide.

The LRHMHS Dual Diagnosis Program plays an important role in assisting Mental Health Services (both clinical and non-clinical), and Alcohol and other drug services to increase their capacity to support consumers and carers.

Priority activities for the LRHMHS Dual Diagnosis Program include:

·         Assisting individual services to establish quality dual diagnosis practices within their services that meet the requirements of the Dual Diagnosis Key Directions and Priorities Action Plan 2007-2010. 

·         Providing education and training to all stakeholders.

·         Working collaboratively with statewide Dual Diagnosis teams in developing consistent standards of service delivery, best practice and providing advice to the Department of Human Services. 

·         Working with the Victorian DD Education Unit in the design and delivery of dual diagnosis education and training across both Victorian mental health and drug and alcohol workforces. 

·         Managing projects that will promote service improvement, for example, the reciprocal rotation project.

·         Supporting the provision of direct care in each sector to assist with complex dual diagnosis presentations in collaboration with senior clinical staff, or case managers.

 

Emotional health support for parents

Welcoming a new baby can be a time of intense emotion whether you are a first time parent or not.

If you're experiencing distressing feelings such as:

  • anxiety
  • frequent tearfulness
  • lack of motivation
  • a sad or low mood
  • feeling overwhelmed
  • problems with eating and sleeping
  • a general sense of not enjoying motherhood and your baby
  • a fear of harming yourself or your baby

you're not alone.

About 100,000 expecting and new parents in Australia are struggling with depression or anxiety, during pregnancy and the year after the birth of their child.

Our Perinatal Emotional Health Program works with women who are pregant or parents in their home after their child is born. The service is available to parents with an infant up to 12 months of age and complements the residential program offered by our Agnes Parent and Infant Unit.

Our perinatal program offers you a chance to talk about your difficulties in a safe, supportive environment.

After a comprehensive assessment our clinicians provide counselling and support, information about emotional health and education and strategies about coping and managing stressful situations.

We can also link you to other health and community services.

How to get help

Your doctor, midwife or maternal and child health nurse can make a referral on your behalf or you, your partner or support person can contact us through the Mental Health Triage Service on 1300 363 322.

While you may have the support of family and friends, it is important to seek assistance from a health professional. You must look after yourself in order to look after your baby.

Emotional health support for parents

Welcoming a new baby can be a time of intense emotion whether you are a first time parent or not.

If you're experiencing distressing feelings such as:

  • anxiety
  • frequent tearfulness
  • lack of motivation
  • a sad or low mood
  • feeling overwhelmed
  • problems with eating and sleeping
  • a general sense of not enjoying motherhood and your baby
  • a fear of harming yourself or your baby 

you're not alone.

About 100,000 expecting and new parents in Australia are struggling with depression or anxiety, during pregnancy and the year after the birth of their child.

Our Perinatal Emotional Health Program works with women who are pregant or parents in their home after their child is born. The service is available to parents with an infant up to 12 months of age and complements the residential program offered by our Agnes Parent and Infant Unit.

Our perinatal program offers you a chance to talk about your difficulties in a safe, supportive environment.

After a comprehensive assessment our clinicians provide counselling and support, information about emotional health and education and strategies about coping and managing stressful situations.

We can also link you to other health and community services.

How to get help

Your doctor, midwife or maternal and child health nurse can make a referral on your behalf or you, your partner or support person can contact us through the Mental Health Triage Service on 1300 363 322.

While you may have the support of family and friends, it is important to seek assistance from a health professional. You must look after yourself in order to look after your baby.

 

 

Families where a parent has mental illness (FaPMI)

There are many challenges for families when a parent has a mental health issue.

Families can be at risk of poverty or face housing problems, disruption to schooling, marital conflict, isolation and a reduction of social and leisure activities. Vulnerable children and their families are often hidden and struggle to get the help they need.

The Families where a Parent has a Mental Illness (FaPMI) strategy is a statewide initiative to reduce the impact to all family members.

It was launched in 2007 to increase the capacity of specialist mental health services and their partners to recognise and respond to parental mental illness, the needs of parents and of their children. FaPMI takes a collaborative approach between agencies to support parents and their children.

Latrobe Regional Hospital's FaPMI coordinators and clinician work with groups across Gippsland including our own mental health service to build capacity in delivering services that best meet the needs of families facing mental health challenges. Some of these groups include schools, othe hospitals and community health services, mental health community support services, alcohol and other drug treatment services, indigenous health providers and Child First. 

FaPMI activity in Gippsland has also included:

  • service development and governance
  • workforce development
  • networking and partnerships
  • consultation
  • resource distribution and management of a brokerage fund
  • peer support
  • awareness raising and mental health promotion
  • research, publication and statewide activities.

 

Contact details:

Contact our FaPMI coordinators on 5142 8975 or 5128 0100.

  

For additional resources and information see:

The National Children of Parents with a Mental Illness (CoPMI) Initiative website www.copmi.net.au

 

 

Flynn Unit

People who require a hospital stay and more intensive treatment to improve their mental health are admitted to the Flynn Unit which is the only inpatient facility in Gippsland.

The unit focuses on providing people with treatment, education and rehabilitation in an effort to help them return to their communities to begin the recovery journey.

Flynn delivers a range of therapeutic interventions ranging from medically-based pharmaceutical interventions to social, psychological and recreational therapies with the aim of managing the illness and preventing relapse. The needs of the person are met by a team including nursing, medical and allied health professionals.

Our team of consumer and carer consultants have a lived experience of mental illness and are able to support people and their families or carers through what is a stressful time in their lives.

Most people usually stay in Flynn for up to 12 days and can be referred to specialist services in the community following discharge.

 

Gippsland Early Psychosis Service

Psychosis is a term used to describe a mental state in which a person experiences a distortion or loss of contact with reality.

They may experience a change in their thinking and perception which can also cause changes in mood and behaviour.

Psychosis is extremely frightening to the sufferer and everyone around them.

A young person may start to withdraw from their family, friends and workmates, sleep or eat poorly and become preoccupied with a particular theme such as death, politics or religion. They may uncharacteristically neglect household, personal or parental responsibilities, personal hygiene or appearance.

Their performance at school or work may deteriorate and they may have difficulty concentrating, following conversations or remembering things.

If psychosis is not identified and treated early, there is an increased risk of subsequent problems such as disruptions to relationships, an increased likelihood of substance abuse, increased risk of depression and suicide and loss of self esteem and identity.

Early detection and appropriate treatment offer the best chance for a full recovery.

Gippsland Early Psychosis Service provides assistance and support for young people aged between 16-25 experiencing psychosis for the first time.

It assists with individual support and therapy to work towards recovery and organises and provides ongoing treatment with a psychiatrist and general practitioner. The service works with a young person and their family or carer to provide information and link them with agencies and program that can assist with factors like drug and alcohol problems, housing, education and finances.

Consultation, education and specialist advice is also available to mental health professionals, GPs and other service providers.

 

Local approach to mental health research

Years of experience working with families has led to a long list of questions for social worker, Michael Naughton. 

Finally, he’s getting the opportunity to find answers to some of those questions in a major research project about the prevalence of mental illness in families who seek support through Latrobe Regional Hospital’s Child and Youth Mental Health Service. 

Michael, a PhD candidate is among a group of staff at LRH who have embarked on major research projects about mental health and the services available in the local community. 

Their work was showcased at an event at LRH in October. 

Michael is trying to find out how a parent’s mental illness can affect their child’s mental health and if a child with a mental illness has a similar impact on a parent. 

“It hasn’t really been examined by anyone in the world,” Michael said. “We need to find out what is happening when a child of someone with a mental illness starts to have a deterioration in their own mental health. 

“At the moment services may be working with a parent with a mental illness and their child has anxiety, but that isn’t looked at or addressed at the same time.” 

Michael has just completed collecting data about families and their mental health across Gippsland. The data so far indicates a link between a child with a mental illness and a parent experiencing their own mental health issue and vice versa. 

“My research is about studying the data and saying, yes, this is an issue and here are some solutions that may help families.” 

Consultant psychiatrist Dr Stuart Thomas said new research such as that being undertaken by LRH nurses, allied health staff and psychiatrists, draws on and develops the best ideas from the past so it is relevant and responsive to the situations clinicians and people with mental health issues currently face.

 “LRH is proud to support and participate in psychiatric research, as it plays its part in promoting excellence in understanding and support of people who use our service and their families,” he said. 

An example of that is the work being undertaken by LRH intake clinician Jonine Naughton, who as part of her PhD research, is analysing a system used by the Child and Youth Mental Health Service called the Choice and Partnership Approach Model (CAPA). 

The CAPA initial Choice appointment enables a young person and their family to develop a joint formulation of the problem and agree upon future goals. Part of the process is for  young people and their families to determine whether the Child and Youth Mental Health Service or another agency will be part of ongoing care. 

LRH was the first health service in Victoria to implement the CAPA model, however Jonine Naughton said there has been little research on it nationally or internationally and nothing on whether it is a self-directed recovery process. 

“CAPA has contributed to a reduction in waiting lists. At LRH the waiting lists for child and youth mental health programs have gone down from an average of 63 days to 10,” she said. 

“We’re doing a better job at seeing young people in a timely manner and we’re also seeing young people who are not so distressed by their mental health or their symptoms or social effects because of this.” 

Jo said the CAPA model turned clinicians from “experts with power”, to facilitators who help young people and their families identify issues and come up with a plan for care. 

She will interview people a few months after their Choice appointment to find out whether they were able to follow through with their initial goals. 

“I’m very passionate about service development for children and adolescents so this is really exciting research for me,” Jonine said. 

“Other health services will be able to determine from my research whether CAPA is a model they are able to use.” 

The Mental Health Research Symposium also highlighted a project on cognitive behaviour therapy for older adults with insomnia and depression in a community mental health setting, trans-cultural psychiatry, child protection management and the use of an amino acid in borderline personality disorder.

 

Macalister Unit

People over the age of 65 with mental health or behavioural issues are cared for by the Macalister Unit at Latrobe Regional Hospital.

The unit has 10 acute assessment beds and 10 nursing home beds for people with complex needs.

Macalister provides a safe and supportive environment for residents with a range of activities and programs including art, cooking, music and games.

Our pet therapy program recognises the benefits of the warmth and companionship of an animal. Macalister regularly hosts visits by therapy dogs.

Looking for a way to support our community this Christmas?

Proceeds from this year's Christmas Giving Appeal will be used to purchase humidifier machines for our Critical Care Unit. These machines work with oxygen systems to help our patients to breathe easier. 

Can you help us reach the $36,000 target? Donations of $2 or more are tax deductible. Click on the Make A Donation link or contact LRH Fundraising on 5173 8577. Thank you for your support!

Latrobe Regional Hospital

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Address
10 Village Avenue, Traralgon West, Victoria, 3844
PO Box 424, Traralgon, Victoria,3844
ABN: 18 128 843 652

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